21 Days of Snowglobe: An Introduction to Quixotic Fusion

Tahoe, Tahoe South, Snowglobe

Snowglobe Music Festival is returning to Tahoe South for it’s second year and it’s not too late to join in on the fun. Three day passes and single day tickets are still on sale.

THE 21 DAYS of SNOWGLOBE: counting down to all things involving the fest, including insider tips, band interviews, event coverage and more! We took two days off to celebrate the holidays so here we are at Day 15 of the 21 Days of Snowglobe with:

QUIXOTIC FUSION

Quixotic Fusion is an impressive and complex collaboration between dance, film aerial arts, music and fashion.  The Kansas City Based Performing Arts Group creates performances and installations that both engage and challenge the audience.  In seven years, Quixotic has grown from a renegade group that took over abandoned warehouses to invent performances spaces, to a touring show with a community school.  Under the tutelage and the artistic direction of Anthony Magliano, a graphic designer, percussionist and composer, and Mica Thomas, whose proficiency in stage lighting earned him a master’s in Lighting Design at Penn State University, Quixotic has gained traction in the performing arts and is well known for their creative experimentation.  Words really do their performances, described by the Kansas City Star as a “feast of musical and visual delights,” no justice and after sitting down and speaking with Quixotic Dancer and Aerialist Megan Stockman last week, I simply cannot wait to experience them in person.

Thank you to Megan who took the time out of her day of lessons and rehearsals to chat with me about Quixotic’s program.  Megan’s background is in ballet, modern, contemporary and aerial performance. She has training with many different schools such as Alvin Ailey, American Dance Center, Kansas City Ballet and University of Missouri-Kansas City. She has also received the opportunity to work with and assist world-renowned choreographers Tokyo Kevin Inouye and Sonya Tayeh.

Megan Stockman and Devan Smith of Quixotic Fusion.  Photo: Brad Austin

Lauren: Tell me a little bit about your training and history and how you became involved with the company.  

Megan: I started working with the company about three and a half years ago.  I was a dance student at the College Conservatory [University of Missouri-Kansas City] and I really liked it however I wasn’t getting all my needs as an artist met.  One day Quixotic performed at UKC and I was really inspired and it was exactly what I was looking for and envisioning in my head.  It was so strange that it was right there in the palm of my hand.  I introduced myself to the director and started working with the company and got thrown into aerial and it all took off from there.  I have a very diverse background in dance: I enjoy a lot of different styles.  I have ballet training. I also went to Alvin Ailey.  I’ve learned a lot of African dancing, capoeira.  I do hip hop, ballroom and have a little bit of every style under my belt.  However, contemporary ballet is my foundation.  That’s me in a bubble.

We all live in Kansas City.  We have quite a few artists in residency here and we have a small studio here that we started working out of a year and a half ago but before that we were literally just working out of an old warehouse that had really low ceilings so aerial was really difficult to practice.  We had no heat so you had to layer up.  We had no water so you had to make sure that you go to the bathroom before you go to practice.

L: I read that when they started seven years ago they would basically go to owners of old abandoned warehouses and offer to clean it up and just host renegade shows?

M: We would just take over: spend about a week in the warehouse, fix it up, make it look pretty like this beautiful installment.  One thing that Quixotic is really good at is installments, which we don’t get to do as much as we like to so we’re hoping to keep growing the company and continue to do installments.  You need performances and not just dance on a stage: we’re all about the collaborative process and creating an experience for our audience.

Quixotic Fusion – Photography by Mike Strong

L: How many full time artists are on the paid staff at the company?

M: That I can’t answer because we’re not for profit, so while I work full time that doesn’t mean that you’re going to get this much money.  You put yourself out there in order to make money.  I teach a lot of private lessons in order to get by and I love teaching.

L: Do you teach through the school or on the side on your own?

M: We have a whole school here and our school is really growing.  We just did a really special student showcase yesterday and announced that our school will have it’s own performing arts troupe.  There will be a performing arts troupe of  Quixotic people.  Our school has such a wide range of ages.

L: Tell me a little bit about how that came about and what the relationship is between the school and the performing arts troupe?

M: When we first developed the school we wanted to share what we do.  it’s a great thing to be able to give your talents to other people and and share that locally and create a community of artists.  Then we thought maybe this could pay our rent and we could stay in this building instead of working out of warehouses with no water and heat.  Now our school is able to pay our rent and that helps out a lot because we have somewhere to practice.  Right now the school is growing and really picking up: we have classes in here from the morning all the way into the night.   We also have rehearsals in here.  We’re all in here together and it’s a really great vibe when you come.  Everyone is really nice and all the students are really open to learning and all of the performers help the students.  It’s neat to have our school right there with our company because we are able to feed off each other, help each other and they [the students] inspire us every day.

L: So I’ve watched a little bit of the performances online and they are so complex and so big and so huge it’s mind blowing what you guys are doing and when I think of places with really modern performing arts I can’t say that I would have ever thought Kansas City.

M: Yeah, it’s kind of random and I think that’s what is so neat about our group.  When you are here, there’s something about not having influences all around you.  We are inspired from many other companies however when you are secluded you are really able to concentrate on just your singular group performance, your concept, and not get ideas from a group next door.  When you’re in a big melting pot, I feel as if performance arts groups are really sharing a lot of ideas and not only are you sharing ideas but you’re sharing the same costume designers, the same make up artists and in Kansas City we are really able to just buckle down on our concept and our installment.

Quixotic Fusion’s eso:terra, a performance ensemble

L: I feel like that says a lot about the group itself: that it came out of a need to create a certain type of community and something that was lacking that people wanted to invent.

M: We have some really amazing companies in Kansas City: we have the Kansas City Symphony, the Kansas City Ballet and what first happened was a couple of the Kansas City Ballet Dancers got together, Anthony Magliano and some musicians, and they all got together and were like, “During the summer, during our time off, let’s do something different.  I don’t want to do just ballet this summer, I want to do more unique dance.  Let’s put this with it, let’s put music with it, let’s put projections with it.”  Our artistic director is also a graphic designer and he does amazing work with computer graphics.  “So, let’s put this with with dance and see what happens.”  It turned out to be a really neat cohesive unit and it’s a random mix but it blends seamlessly.

L: Tell me about the design process and how a project goes from conception to final project?

M: It’s definitely all over the place at first.  We experiment a lot.  We have experimentation nights where we throw different materials together, different projections together, different lighting, different costumes.  It starts with experimentation.   Then we collaborate and talk all together:  what was successful, what was not and decide to explore one concept.  From there we turn it into a piece from a show: from there we adapt things, due to the venue, due to whatever kind of budget we have.  Sometimes we’re on a really tight budget and we have to get creative with our materials.  We recycle things and use lighting.  Lighting is a big thing with our group because it really enhances our dance, the projections, and the props.  It really magnifies what we’re trying to show.   Just as in a museum the lighting is so important on each piece, we have so many different pieces in the show.  So it starts with experimentation and then we move on to collaborating and talking through it and then really adapt it to a show to make it fit and conceptualize it to a story, a theme, an emotion.

L: Did you tour with the group this summer?

M: I did – we were all over the place this summer!  We were in Colorado, Whistler (Canada), Squaw Valley near Lake Tahoe, Vermont.  We performed at Electric Forest.  We were on the main stage this year and we had two shows.  It was an amazing experience and the staff took good care of us.  It was a really great summer to get that out there and share what we do to the world and the country.  Now we are hoping to do that again next summer.

L: The Quixotic Troupe is very large.  You only take part of that group on tour?

M: We have a lot of artists at home though that are still working on what we’re doing as we travel.  We have people back at home at the school in the studio: our costume designers are still at work.  So when we go out of town at first it’s a little bit smaller but it’s still a really big cast but depending on the show we have about 20-30 people touring with us.

L: What are the challenges of taking it on tour?

M: The challenges are being an athlete and being in a van and being in tight proximity.  The heat is a hard one, for me as an athlete.  As far as our costumes go, those are hard to travel with because we’ll be in the forest and we get dirt on the costume and then you have to magically find washers.  There are a lot of different challenges.

L: I’m an athlete and I know all too well that sometimes when you’re traveling you go a little stir crazy.  Your used to the endorphins and release from exercise and you get cranky on travel days. 

M: Some festivals don’t have the healthiest food too so I’ll pack my own food for some of the festivals.  Wanderlust festival is so great because they have all my diet there.

L: What show are you guys bringing to Snowglobe?

M: At Snowglobe we don’t have a set show.  It’s not like what we’ve done in the past with a 60 minute performance.  At Snowglobe we’re going to do a lot of ambient performances.  They are going to be a little bit more of a surprise.  We’re going to aerial, dance, fire, stilt walkers, intense costuming and extreme makeup design.  You’ll know our look because we are black, white and gray.  We try to stick to those colors for lighting purposes.  They catch light really well and blends everything better because there is so much going on.  There are going to be a lot of pop up performances.  We’ll be ambiance.

Quixotic Fusion – Photography by Mike Strong

L: You are a non-profit. If people like what they see at Snowglobe and want to contribute to the program, how do they do that?

M: If people want to contribute to our program they can go our website: there is a link on there to donate. You can always contact our artistic directors Mica Thomas and Anthony Magliano and they can organize it all and make sure that your funds get to the right place.

L: We are excited to host you guys here and ring in the New Year with you.  What is on the agenda for Quixotic for 2013?  What are your big goals?

M: We have a lot of cool and exciting things, however we haven’t released our dates yet.  A lot of things are still getting confirmed so I don’t want to reveal too much.  One thing I can tell you is that we’re doing a performance at Envision Festival in Costa Rica in February, we’re stoked on that one.  It will be good to get away from Kansas in the middle of the winter.  Our goals: we would really like to keep traveling both in and out of the country and keep doing festivals, shows and installations.  We have a lot of cool things in the works so keep an eye out for us.  We’ll be doing a really unique installment in Kansas City in April at the Nelson Atkins Museum of Art: we did this show about three and a half years and we’re bringing the show back but making it bigger and better.  This is where we premier wall dancing with projections.  We have an 80 foot wall with dancers that high interacting with projections on a harness.  It’s one of my favorites.

L: I feel like festivals are a really great way to find new fans.  Do you feel like you came away from the summer with a lot of new exposure?

M: Even just on Facebook we went from 7,000 fans to around 11,000.  Quite a bit more fan base through just media.  In Kansas City especially, I’ll go outside of Kansas City and when I used to go out there nobody even had a clue what Quixotic was or even a trace and now people are like, “Woah!  You work with Quixotic!”  and I’m like, “What!  You know who we are?  That’s amazing!”  More people are hearing about us and I think performing at festivals is a great way because you’re able to share your work with a lot of people at one time and they are able to talk all weekend about performances that they enjoyed.  It’s a great way to share.

L: Thank you so much for taking the time to talk to me and I look forward to seeing you guys at the show.

M: Thank you for the opportunity.  I will see you at Snowglobe!

FOR MORE ON QUIXOTIC FUSION:

QUIXOTIC FUSION will be providing ambiance and pop up shows all around Snowglobe on Saturday, December 29th and Sunday, December 30th. Keep an eye out for their performances which will include aerials, fire, dance, stilt walking and more.

COMING UP:

  • Who to see at the fest, reviews and photos! See you there!

WHAT YOU MISSED:

21 Days of Snowglobe: Drive Safe

Tahoe, Tahoe South, Snowglob

Snowglobe Music Festival is returning to Tahoe South for it’s second year and it’s not too late to join in on the fun. Three day passes and single day tickets are still on sale.

THE 21 DAYS of SNOWGLOBE: counting down to all things involving the fest, including insider tips, band interviews, event coverage and more! Day 12 of the 21 Days of Snowglobe brings you:

SNOW DRIVING SURVIVAL SKILLS

  • Be prepared.  If you are driving to Tahoe from the Bay and you do not have a four wheel drive vehicle you MUST have chains.  If you get caught driving without chains, you will get fined.  I would also recommend carrying the following in your car to Tahoe in the winter: a shovel, extra gloves and hats, flashlights and flares, an old sleeping bag or blanket.
  • Slow down and don’t tailgate.   Double the distance between you and the other cars.  In icy and snowy conditions,  if you’re doing 25 mph, you should have 8-10 car lengths between you and the car in front of you.   Don’t make any sudden erratic movements or changes to your pace or manner of driving. DON’T SLAM ON YOUR BRAKES. Remember when you are in a line of cars that while the choices of those in front of you affect you, your choices affect the cars behind you.   If something happens and you slam on your brakes, you are going to slide.  Your anti lock brakes will not help you in icy slippery conditions.
  • Look ahead.  Get ready for corners and other obstacles long before you arrive at them.  Have an exit plan.
  • Brake long before you enter a corner and accelerate out of the corner.
  • Control your speed and let your engine slow you down.  Shift into a lower gear any time you are going down a hill or steep grade or if you need to slow down.  Do this even if you drive an automatic.  By letting your engine control your speed, you won’t have to brake, which will keep your car from skidding and will keep the locals from screaming at frustration behind you over your brake lights.
  • Learn to control a skid.  If you start to skid, let off the brakes and avoid looking at the obstacle your skidding towards.   Looking at your exit, lightly turn into the skid and accelerate slightly.  In the event of an uncontrolled skid, if you don’t have room to steer out, head for a snowbank.
  • Get updates on road conditions and closures at Caltrans Website or by calling 1-800.427.7623

COMING UP:

  • 21 Days of Snowglobe: Who to See at the Fest, Day 1
  • 21 Days of Snowglobe: Interview with Quixotic Fusion

WHAT YOU MISSED:

21 Days of Snowglobe: Your Guide to Music Outside the Fest

Tahoe, Tahoe South, Snowglob

Snowglobe Music Festival is returning to Tahoe South for it’s second year and it’s not too late to join in on the fun. Three day passes and single day tickets are still on sale.

THE 21 DAYS of SNOWGLOBE: counting down to all things involving the fest, including insider tips, band interviews, event coverage and more! Day 10 of the 21 Days of Snowglobe brings you:

YOUR GUIDE TO MUSIC OUTSIDE THE FEST

Not buying a ticket to Snowglobe?  Coming early?  Staying late?  Here are all your options to party hardy outside the festival gates. 

  • Montblue is home to the Official Snowglobe After Parties. Entry is free to Snowglobe wristband holders but you can buy tickets separately if you are not attending the fest.

Post Globe, Snowglobe After Parties

  • Raw Bar recently opened in the location of the old Bill’s Casino. They’re hosting a hip hop extravaganza on Wednesday, Dec 26th and Snowglobe Afterparties every night after the fest.

  • The Divided Sky is hosting a New Year’s Eve Dance party with DJ Berkmon and the Meyers Roots boys playing Old Skool, Hip Hop, Reggae, and Funk as they ring in 2013.

COMING UP:

  • 21 Days of Snowglobe: Who to See at the Fest, Day 1
  • 21 Days of Snowglobe: Interview with Quixotic Fusion

WHAT YOU MISSED:

21 Days of Snowglobe: Interview with Beats Antique

Tahoe, Tahoe South, Snowglob

Snowglobe Music Festival is returning to Tahoe South for it’s second year and it’s not too late to join in on the fun. Three day passes and single day tickets are still on sale.

THE 21 DAYS of SNOWGLOBE: counting down to all things involving the fest, including insider tips, band interviews, event coverage and more! Day 9 of the 21 Days of Snowglobe brings you:

AN INTERVIEW WITH BEATS ANTIQUE

beats-knife-fight_web

Beats Antique is the confluence of three talented performers with very different backgrounds. Zoe Jakes: a classically trained dancer in jazz and ballet, who fell in love with belly dancing. David Satori: who graduated from the California Institute of the Arts with a degree in music performance and composition. Tommy Cappel: a Virginia native, the son of two music teachers, the brother of a drummer and a graduate of the Berklee College of Music in Boston. When Zoe approached the others about collaborating on an experimental project that involved belly dancing for Miles Copeland, they readily agreed and out of that Beats Antique was born. Six years later, Beats Antique is thriving on the support of their fans.  They recently released their seventh album, Contraption Vol II, and are coming off a tour schedule so insanely busy that it involved shows on twenty of the nights in the month of September alone.

Today, the group is in Egypt to headline The Great Convergence Festival: celebrating the dawn of a new era and possibly, the end of the world. Despite joking that they might not make it back, we’re all looking forward to seeing them play at Snowglobe Music Festival next week. Big thanks to David and Tommy who sat down for an interview with me before hopping a plane across the world.

David Satori, Sidecar Tommy, Beats Antique

Lauren: We are lucky to have you guys return frequently to Tahoe thanks to it’s proximity to the bay.  What’s your favorite thing about playing in Tahoe?

David: One of my favorite things is that people have a lot of energy up in that area, people that are there to be active, a lot of people who do a outdoor activities like skiing and mountain biking and all of the above, so it’s sort of a rowdy, fun healthy crowd and then there’s also the Grass Valley/Nevada City crowd that comes out, and the Truckee crowd and the Reno crowd.  It’s a real eclectic active community so we have a lot of fun and there is a lot of energy.  The combination of all that makes a good crowd.

Tommy: I like the fact that it’s so beautiful up there.

L: Next week, you fly out to Egypt to headline the Great Convergence Festival.

D: We might get abducted by aliens and then sucked into the wormhole.

L: You guys haven’t been to Egypt before, but, Tommy, you lived in Serbia?  

T: No, I didn’t live there, I played a festival there and visited there.  I had an amazing experience there and it was at a time when things were still a little chaotic for them as a country so it was a little nerve wracking going over there.  I assume it will be a bit of the same going to Egypt this time.

L: Your shows have a tendency to get a little wild.  What’s the most memorable thing that’s ever happened at a show that you didn’t expect?

T: We’ve had a lot of people jump on stage and do a lot of stage diving when the crowd was not prepared so the stage diver went into a empty abyss and hit the ground: serious stage diving.  The most important thing is that you have to acknowledge the crowd and the crowd acknowledged that you’re coming and a lot of people when they jump up on stage they’re like, “oh shit, I’m up on stage, I gotta do something fast!” and it just doesn’t work.  It’s better that it’s just the artist that does that, the crowd is there for them.  They want you to survive.

L: 2012 has been a busy year for you as a group – tons of touring, the release of an album, a big summer festival circuit – what were the challenges and highlights of such a jam packed tour year?

T: I think that the challenges and highlights are sort of the same thing.  Doing so many shows is really exciting but it also takes a lot out of us, just all the traveling involved doing all those shows is intense.  But you get out there on stage and you have a responsive crowd and everyone is excited and it makes it all worth it.  It’s kind of like the same thing: it’s challenging and fun and just necessary.  We’re responding to people wanting us to play and it’s kind of everything into one.

D: I think our most challenging weekend this summer was also our biggest and most exciting weekend at the same time.  We played Atlanta at a festival called Narnia and then flew to Red Rocks the next morning but our flight was cancelled so we had to rebook our flight and drive all night and then play Red Rocks sound check the next morning at 11 am but it’s red rocks so it’s super difficult but it’s so exciting.  The next night we had to leave from Red Rocks and fly to Seattle for Summer Meltdown.  It’s all a blur and it’s all amazing.

L: How awesome is Red Rocks?  That place is incredible.

T: Ridiculous.  You can’t replace that experience with anything else.  It’s such a beautiful place but then all the crowds are always really excited to be there so that makes it more amped up and then all the people that played there for so long.  As a whole, it’s amazing.

L: Do you have any routines that you keep in order to keep your sanity and keep a schedule when you’re touring?

T:  Honestly, our shows become a routine when we’re on tour. Getting on stage and doing sound check and doing the show.  Sound check is a good routine.  Occasionally we get some exercise, some yoga.

L: How does touring affect your studio work?  Does it make you more or less creative?

T: Touring gets in the way of studio work and studio work suffers a bit when you are on the road too much but at the same time, sometimes we come up with some really great songs on the road.  It’s just a matter of making time for both.

L:  Do you find that the audience is different between a music festival and one of your regular shows?

D: The festival crowd is there to party and the festival atmosphere is already exciting simply because it’s a festival.  The shows have their own excitement but there’s this overall festival excitement that can come over into your set which can be unexpected.  There are a lot of variables that you don’t know.  Sometimes you can be at a show and you know how the night is going to go based on the crowd but at a festival, sometimes the crowds get big in the middle of the set or halfway through the set it can get small because another act is going on at another tent and people want to see them.  When I go to festivals I only stay for three songs.  I never stay for the whole show.  Things are changing and people are coming in and out.

L: Do you guys find that new fans discover you at music fests?

D: Oh definitely.

T: That’s the place to pick up new fans.  We actually as well walk around and see what’s going on around us and find new bands that we like as well.  I think that also it gives artists a chance to see what you’re doing.  The whole thing is an immersive experience whereas at a show, everybody knows what they are going to see, they might be there with friends, it might be their first time but generally that show is about us.  It’s a different feel.

L: I really respect artists that have the courage and inspiration to bring something new to the stage in their live show and really build upon their album, which is something that you all excel at.  What dictates how your live show morphs into what it is over the album itself and how much of that is improvisation and how much of it is planned?

D: We definitely plan our sets out pretty carefully and we like to pick from a lot of our albums.   When we come out with a new album, we don’t necessarily just play all the stuff off the new album.  We really gravitate towards what we’ve been playing over the years and what works for the crowd.  We take some new songs.  A lot of the time when an album comes out, we’re working on music that hasn’t even been put on an album, and when it does come out we’ve been playing those songs already for a year.  It’s a weird cycle, for us, at least since we’re not a pop band playing hit songs that everyone needs to hear.  It’s a strange process.

L: How has your process of writing changed from your very first album to now?

D: I think it’s changed drastically.  The first album we did we were really just experimenting and didn’t know exactly what we were going to do.  It created a really experimental atmosphere whereas now it’s maybe not as experimental in that way but it’s experimental in the way of, “so what are we going to do next?”  The process of it too: the last five albums we’ve had to be writing a lot of stuff on the road and working on it in between shows and tours.  It is a bit chaotic.  With this next coming album we’re going to be working on this winter is going to be the first time since back in those days with the first two albums that we’ll be writing at home, in the same place, and being together, and working on it in an extended format.
L:  You recently said in an interview that Vol 2 is “an answer to volume 1…” that you are “tracing your roots back.”  It’s more acoustic whereas your last album had a little bit more electro based sound.  Are there feelings and emotions that influence and guide you at the start to where your albums head each time or is it something that happens more subconsciously and you realize it later on that it’s gone in this different direction?

D: I think for this album, we found what songs we had.  It was sort of collecting the songs we’d been working on as opposed to being really conscious and saying let’s make an album that sounds like this.  It was more of a compilation in a way.  We have a whole electronic side of what we do and we have the full acoustic side and we’re always trying to balance it out and I think this was a way of balancing it out a little more.

L: I saw you open for Les Claypool here in Tahoe a few years ago and at the time I had never heard of you.  It was an absolute delight and there were so many wonderful surprises for me throughout your set.  One of the things that definitely sticks out in my mind, and probably with a lot of your fans, were the animal masks.  Now that they’ve taken on such an individual nature and personality of their own, it’s almost like they are another member of the band.  Can we expect them to stick around?  

T: If David has anything to do with it, we’ll be wearing them the whole show.

D: Be careful what you ask for.

T: We sell them at our merch table so fans can go to our merch table or you can get them online at our website.  One of our goals with the animal masks is to have the audience participate a bit with us.  It’s really funny.  At every show, at least once person at almost every show has one: wearing an animal mask.  We really want to see the whole crowd wearing different animal masks.

D: We have one fan from Michigan who wears a baboon mask and he wears it the whole show.  It’s one of the impressive things I’ve ever seen in my whole life is this guy wearing this latex baboon mask for hours – two hours.  You gotta realize, that those things are not comfortable.

T: They’re hot.

D:  It’s really …. it kinda sucks when you wear it.

T:  It’s a labor of love.  We’re doing it for the people.

D:  It brings out a character in you that you might not have other.  When the guy with the baboon mask is there, he dances differently and he’s really fun to look at.  And then throughout the show you see the people around him start to interact with him and get more comfortable with the baboon.

L: So Beats Antique’s collective dream is an entire audience full of animal masks?

T and D:  YES.

L: You’ve worked with a lot of really talented collaborators: what dream collaborations do you have on your list for the future?

T:  We have a list of a lot of people.  It would be fun to do something with Bjork, with David Byrne, Peter Gabriel, Metalica.

D:  I would take Tool as well.

T: I’ve always wanted to collaborate with some more pop artists as well, just in general.

D:  Katy Perry.

T [laughing]: That’s David’s dream.  I’m more like lets work with Bon Iver, the Weekend or something.

L: Greatest accomplishment of 2012?  

T: Surviving.

D:  Yes, Suriving.

T:  Not breaking up.  The band not breaking up.  Funny but true.

L: Provided that you don’t get swept away into the wormhole on the solstice, what’s next on the horizon for 2013?  

D: The first part of the year we’re going to work on our album and then start touring like crazy again.

T:  International – Europe, South America, hopefully.

L:  Last but not least, what act are you each most looking forward to seeing at Snowglobe?

D: Deadmau5, he’s always fun to watch.  Wiz Khalifa.

L:  I’m really looking forward to seeing Chromeo.

D: Oh yeah!  Chromeo!  I forgot they were playing.  I axe all of the rest.  I just want to see them.

L:  Thanks guys!  I really appreciate you taking the time to talk to me and we’ll see you at Snowglobe.

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FOR MORE ON BEATS ANTIQUE:

BEATS ANTIQUE will be on the Main Stage on Saturday, December 29th at 6:45 PM.  Beats Antique is an eclectic mix of modern technology, live instrumentation, brass bands, string quartets, glitch, and dubstep accompanied by belly dancing and animal masks.  Frankly, it’s a not to be missed show.  Check them out: if you want to go down the rabbit hole.  Animal masks not required, but suggested.  Skip it if: you’re a huge fan already, have already seen the show this year and want to check out something new over at the Archnemesis show. Beats Antique’s new album, Contraption Vol. 2, is available via download on Amazon. Check out their new video for Skeleton Key, from Contraption Vol. 2, below.

COMING UP:

  • 21 Days of Snowglobe: Interview with Quixotic Fusion
  • 21 Days of Snowglobe: Who to See on Day 1!

WHAT YOU MISSED:

21 Days of Snowglobe: Cold Weather Cocktails

Tahoe, Tahoe South, Snowglob

Snowglobe Music Festival is returning to Tahoe South for it’s second year and it’s not too late to join in on the fun. Three day passes and single day tickets are still on sale.

THE 21 DAYS of SNOWGLOBE: counting down to all things involving the fest, including insider tips, band interviews, event coverage and more! Day 8 of the 21 Days of Snowglobe brings you:

COZY WINTER COCKTAILS!

The weather outside might be frightful, but my dear in these joints it’s SO delightful.
Not skiing?  Don’t want to go sledding or ice skating?  Then post yourself up and make friends with the bartender at one of these fine establishments while you wait for 3:00 to roll around.

  • Nepheles is my favorite place to spend a snowy afternoon. The bar is dark, the ambiance is cozy, and sometimes they have venison chili on the bar menu. They offer a $10 kobe beef burger in the bar.
  • The Riva Grill is some of Tahoe South’s best lakefront cocktailing. The view is amazing, the bar is large and spacious and it’s the only place in town to get a real margarita and by real I mean one that is made with lime juice. Sidle up to the bar and try one of their Peppermint Stick Triple Thick Shakes.
  • The Beacon is the Riva’s lake-front cocktailing competition. If you take a trip out to Emerald Bay, stop by the Beacon on the way back. Right on the lake in Camp Richardson, the Beacon has some of the best fried calamari I’ve ever eaten.
  • The Lucky Beaver is a great choice if you are desperate for a quality burger (honestly, they aren’t kidding – it’s a good burger. And, oh my goodness cajun tator tots!) and sports. They have a wide selection of beers on tap and the Mark West Pinot, which makes me happy.

    Apres Wine Bar, Tahoe, Tahoe South

  • Apres Wine Bar is the best choice for the vinos in the group. JP, Barb and their staff are generous with their wine knowledge and you can purchase tastes with a tasting card, by the glass, half carafes or the bottle.
  • The Divided Sky is a great choice if you are willing to venture outside the beaten path. It’s my personal favorite bar: with a dark interior and a lounge-y feel, I always feel at home. Their signature drink is the Greyhound and it’s made with fresh squeezed grapefruit juice but they also have a in house espresso machine if you want something dark, warm, alcoholic and caffeinated.

I LIKE DIVE BARS

More apt to drink a PBR than a fancy cocktail?  Check out these options:

  • Turn 3 may be Tahoe’s original NASCAR bar, but it’s also it’s original dive bar. 2 pool tables, free popcorn, and peanut shells littering the floor give this place it’s character.
  • Steamers Bar and Grill is just across the street from the Turn, but it’s worth a visit in itself. In the summer, their back patio is my favorite pace to soak up the sun while drinking pitchers of Longboard. In the winter, there clientele is rowdy, the food greasy and on Tuesday, the tacos are always a good choice.

COMING UP:

  • 21 Days of Snowglobe: Interview with Beats Antique
  • 21 Days of Snowglobe: Interview with Quixotic Fusion

WHAT YOU MISSED:

21 Questions with Nobody Beats the Drum

Tahoe, Tahoe South, Snowglob

Snowglobe Music Festival is returning to Tahoe South for it’s second year and it’s not too late to join in on the fun. Three day passes and single day tickets are still on sale.

THE 21 DAYS of SNOWGLOBE: counting down to all things involving the fest, including insider tips, band interviews, event coverage and more! Day 7 of the 21 Days of Snowglobe brings you:

21 QUESTIONS WITH JORI COLLIGNON of NOBODY BEATS THE DRUM

Nobody Beats the Drum’s tour schedule from 2012 is enough to make you tired just looking at it.  Jori Collignon, Sjam Sjamsoedin and Rogier van der Zwaag have been performing and touring worldwide since 2003.   Considered to be the “future of Dutch dance music,” Nobody Beats the Drum kicked off the year in my hometown at SXSW and then spent a dizzying amount of time touring North America including impressive stops at Ultra Music Fest, Sasquatch Music Festival, Pacha, Webster Hall and the Brooklyn Bowl all along the way wowing audiences with their unique sound, combining electro, hiphop and breakbeat and impressive visuals at their live show, which includes a 9 screen installation.  The Natural Thing EP was released this summer.  Big thanks to Jori, who took a break from their exhausting schedule to answer 21 Questions for the 21 Days of Snowglobe.

NBTD 20Q

FOR MORE ON NOBODY BEATS THE DRUM:

NOBODY BEATS THE DRUM will be in the Sierra Tent on Monday, December 31st at 8:30 PM.  Check them out if you enjoy mind altering visuals, used to take acid when “you were young” and/or like to partake raucous sweaty dance parties. Skip it if: your musical tastes tend to be more pop centric. You’re best left at the main stage for Polica.

COMING UP:

  • 21 Days of Snowglobe: Interview with Quixotic Fusion
  • 21 Days of Snowglobe: Interview with Beats Antique

WHAT YOU MISSED:

21 Days of Snowglobe: 21 Questions with Big Chocolate

Tahoe, Tahoe South, Snowglob

Snowglobe Music Festival is returning to Tahoe South for it’s second year and it’s not too late to join in on the fun. Three day passes and single day tickets are still on sale.

THE 21 DAYS of SNOWGLOBE: counting down to all things involving the fest, including insider tips, band interviews, event coverage and more! Day 5 of the 21 Days of Snowglobe brings you:

21 QUESTIONS WITH BIG CHOCOLATE

Red headed Cameron Argon has had quite the journey to the world of EDM.  After growing up in Huntington Beach, CA, Argon moved just outside of Tahoe at the age of 15 and began self recording death metal and selling it on Itunes.  His creativity and inventiveness took him on a solo tour to Moscow at a young age and then later on to Europe, on tour with a metal band.  Today, his production involves the varied musical genres his life is rooted in: from metal to punk to dubstep to drum and bass, Big Chocolate keeps your interest piqued and your emotions moving just as quickly as he does.  After touring with the Vans Warped Tour in 2011, Big Chocolate released the Red Headed LOCC album earlier this year and has recently followed it up with the RED EP released on December 4, 2012. Argon is a busy man: sought after for remixes and busy with touring, yet somehow he manages to post a new youtube video everyday.

Big Chocolate 20Q copy v1

FOR MORE ON BIG CHOCOLATE:

  • Youtube – he posts videos every day. Yes. EVERY DAY. That’s dedication.

BIG CHOCOLATE will be on the Techibeats.com Stage on Saturday, December 29th at 5:45 PM.  Check him out if your wildest dream is merging the Black Stage at FUN FUN FUN Fest with the Le Plur Stage at Voodoo Music Fest.  Or if you love the gritty ambition that shines through when you mix Cannibal Corpse with dubstep.  Skip it if: you have no idea what I’m talking about right now.

COMING UP:

  • 21 Days of Snowglobe: 21 Questions with Nobody Beats the Drum
  • 21 Days of Snowglobe: 21 Questions with Archnemesis

WHAT YOU MISSED:

21 Days of Snowglobe: Survive the Fest

Tahoe, Tahoe South, Snowglob

Snowglobe Music Festival is returning to Tahoe South for it’s second year and it’s not too late to join in on the fun. Three day passes and single day tickets are still on sale.

THE 21 DAYS of SNOWGLOBE: counting down to all things involving the fest, including insider tips, band interviews, event coverage and more! Day 4 of the 21 Days of Snowglobe brings you:

HOW TO SURVIVE THE FEST!

GETTING TO THE FEST

  • Dress warm. No seriously. This ain’t burning man and I know you were here last year and there wasn’t snow on the ground, but that is not the case this year.  Snowsuits optional.  If you must wear a ridiculous skirt, make sure you put some polypropylene base layers under those tights.  Buy those super cheap disposable hand and toe warmers at the grocery store.  You’ll be the only person there with warm toes and you won’t regret it.
  • Drink water. You’re from sea level? Drink three times as much water as you think you need. Those of us who live at altitude love to watch those of you from sea level get drunk on one beer. It happens.

Yum Truck Logo

  • Don’t forget to eat dinner.  How can you not when The YUM Truck will be there?  The Yum Truck, Tahoe’s own delectable and inventive food truck, will be open inside the fest all three days with a killer menu:
  • Bombay Tacos~ Tender Chicken Breast marinated in Yogurt and Indian spices then Grilled and Simmered in a Spicy Tomato Cream sauce and served in a Corn Tortilla with fresh Cilantro Slaw and Toasted Almonds.
  • Bacon Cheeseburger Sliders~ Two mini all Beef Sliders with Cheddar Cheese, Crispy Bacon, Crispy Onions and Homemade Spicy Ketchup on Cheddar Onion Slider Rolls.
  • Barbecue Chicken Quesadillas~ Tender Grilled Chicken Breast Simmered in Barbecue Sauce and Stuffed into a Tortilla with Cheddar Jack Cheese and Grilled, Served with a Cream Corn Dipping Sauce.
  • Hippie Tacos~ A Corn Tortilla stuffed with Hummus, Cilantro Slaw, and Toasted Almonds with Bombay Sriracha swirl sauce.
  • Spicy Peanut Dog~ All Beef Hot Dog with Peanut Butter, Sriracha, and a Sweet and Spicy Jalapeno Onion Relish.
  • Look around you. Holy snow covered peaks Batman!  It’s gorgeous in Tahoe and you’re at an outdoor music fest with thousands of excited people to ring in the New Year.  You made a wise choice my friend.  Haven’t bought your ticket yet?  Better snap that three day pass up quick like!  It will sell out and you’ll be left out in the cold.  With no music.  Instead of in the cold with music.  See what I did there.

COMING UP:

  • 21 Days of Snowglobe: Interview with Beats Antique
  • 21 Days of Snowglobe: 21 Questions with Big Chocolate

WHAT YOU MISSED:

  • Day 2: Shop Local with my favorite things to buy for myself or that person I pawned my dog off on.

The 21 Days of Snowglobe: Daytime Activities

Tahoe, Tahoe South, Snowglob

Snowglobe Music Festival is returning to Tahoe South for it’s second year and it’s not too late to join in on the fun. Three day passes and single day tickets are still on sale.

THE 21 DAYS of SNOWGLOBE: counting down to all things involving the fest, including insider tips, band interviews, event coverage and more! Day 3 of the 21 Days of Snowglobe brings you:

DAYTIME ACTIVITIES!

Wait, you don’t like skiing?  If Snowglobe brought you to Tahoe but shredding it up on the mountain isn’t on your list of must-do’s, here are some alternative ways to spend your day in Tahoe South if you managed to actually wake up at a decent hour feeling marginally sparky.

  • Snowmobiling is available from a number of different vendors and your options include both self-guided tours and scenic back country adventures.
  • Zip Tahoe offers Tahoe’s only canopy zip line tour and is located at Kirkwood Mountain Resort.
  • Snowshoe rentals are available on site at most of our most popular and scenic snowshoe areas. You may also rent snowshoes at most of the local ski and snowboard rental shops in town.

COMING UP:

  • 21 Days of Snowglobe: How to Survive the Fest
  • 21 Days of Snowglobe: 21 Questions with Nobody Beats the Drum

WHAT YOU MISSED:

  • Day 1: Eat Local with my favorite places to eat in Tahoe South and special treats for festival goers.
  • Day 2: Shop Local with my favorite things to buy for myself or that person I pawned my dog off on.

The 21 Days of Snowglobe: Shop Local

Tahoe, Tahoe South, Snowglob

Snowglobe Music Festival is returning to Tahoe South for it’s second year and it’s not too late to join in on the fun. Three day passes and single day tickets are still on sale.

THE 21 DAYS of SNOWGLOBE: counting down to all things involving the fest, including insider tips, band interviews, event coverage and more!  Day 2 of the 21 Days of Snowglobe brings you:

SHOP LOCAL! 

Read more to discover my favorite places to buy gifts for both myself and others in Tahoe South.

  • Gaialicious, a global gifts boutique, offers an eclectic fusion of gifts, clothing, body care products, music and books. The store supports fair trade and eco friendly products and offers the widest selection of goods from local Tahoe artisans of any other shop in town. 987 Tallac Ave at Harrison Avenue.

TMD_snowflakeVodka

  • RISE Designs is our home-town graphic design and clothing one stop shop. They don’t have a physical storefront to shop in but you’ll be supporting a local business by ordering through their website. Their organic and environmentally friendly threads are inspired by nature, music and design and always hand printed on the most Eco-friendly of materials.

naturythm_vneckgrey_amanda

COMING UP:

  • 21 Days of Snowglobe: Daytime Activities – Did you actually manage to wake up before 10 am and not hungover? Non-musical activities in Tahoe South to fill your day with.
  • 21 Days of Snowglobe: 21 Questions with Big Chocolate