Snowglobe, Day 3

WOW.

What an amazing day yesterday was. It’s clear that almost everyone that attended feels the same way from the insane amount of comments flying around the world of social media.

From start to finish, I loved every minute of New Year’s Eve at Snowglobe Music Fest and I have SO many amazing photos (and was up so late last night, as I’m sure most of you were) that I’m having problems editing them quickly. So, my Day 3 Highlights are going to have to be postponed until tomorrow so I can give all these awesome photos the attention they deserve.

I’ll give you one though.

THIS is what I felt like all day yesterday at Snowglobe. 

ALL.  DAY.  LONG.  

Sjam Sjamsoedin of Nobody Beats the Drum gets the crowd jumping in the Technibeats.com tent.

Snowglobe Highlights, Day 2

Holy frigidly cold temps Batman!  Snowglobe Day 2 was FREEZING from start to finish.  I had on four layers at one point in addition to my jacket, yet there were still girls running amok with bare arms.   The day’s lineup was significantly more EDM heavy, save St. Lucia, who begged of the crowd, “It’s cold! Why did you bring us here?!”

St. Lucia, Snowglobe, Snowglobe Music Fest, Grobler

Despite their cold fingers and frosty breath, St. Lucia and his band put on a stellar show to a crowd full of happy people.  The fans even group hugged his mom when Grobler announced that it was her birthday.

St. Lucia, Snowglobe, Snowglobe Music Fest, Tahoe

Save a handful of acts, sounds of dubstep and electro filled the air for most of the day.  The tents were packed full from front to back for GRiZ and Flosstradamus.  18 year old Madeon followed a crowd already pumped up by Mimosa.  Madeon is so young and tiny his head hardly stood over the DJ table.  I can attest that his youth did not keep girls from screaming for him.

Madeon, Snowglobe, Snowglobe Music Fest, Tahoe

As the chilly day turned to night, the crowd swelled to capacity in anticipation of Deadmau5.  By the time his set started, Snowglobe had announced that they had sold out for the day.

Deadmau5, Snowglobe, Snowglobe Music Fest, Tahoe

The highlight of my day, other than St. Lucia, was certainly the young and eager one man band of Robert Delong.  What started out as a crowd of five people swelled to 100 as Delong’s energy, enthusiasm and danceable tunes filled the festival arena and lured new listeners in.  In the first single from his upcoming album he exclaims the query, “Did I leave it all to chance or did I make you fucking dance?”  I can answer to that: he made Snowglobe fucking dance.

Here are some of my favorite photos from the day.  I’m looking forward to heading back for the final day of the festival with Poolside, Royal Teeth, Nobody Beats the Drum, and Chromeo on the agenda!  Happy New Years!

Snowglobe, Day 1 Highlights

Snowglobe Festival Attendees were treated to quite a different world this year. Now in it’s second year, Snowglobe had lots of music but no snow in 2011. This year is an entirely different story. Revelers rejoiced as the sky opened up and dumped on them throughout most of the afternoon. “It’s as if we’re actually IN A SNOWGLOBE!” we heard one of them yell. The frigid temps and weather, however, didn’t stop quite a few of them from dressing as if they were at Coachella. The amount of sundresses, mini-skirts and tuts with fishnet hose was somewhat shocking. Regardless, those folks were definitely in the minority and most of the crowd accessorized their outfits with fuzzy animal hats and furry boots.

Gentleman Hall, Snowglobe, Snowglobe Music Festival

Gentlemen Hall tries to warm up their hands during their set.

Poppy Boston rockers Gentlemen Hall kicked off the day, playing to a small crowd of serious fans (they knew all the words) and had a hard time keeping their fingers warm as the snow fell.

Cameron Argon, Big Chocolate, Snowglobe Music Festival, Snowglobe, Tahoe

Cameron Argon aka Big Chocolate warms the Technibeats.com Stage Up.

Brooklyn wonder-kid Baauer did not disappoint his fans. The Sierra Tent was jumping up and down from start to finish of his set. Big Chocolate (Cameron Argon) had to compete with Big Gigantic and the start of Beats Antique, but he put on a great show for his fans. His enthusiasm for his fans and his music was clear and his entire family was there to support him.

Beats Antique, Snowglobe Music Festival, Snowglobe, Tahoe, Zoe Jakes

Zoe Jakes of Beats Antique

The festival crowd, which seemed sparse in the early afternoon, grew massively as festival favorites Beats Antique came on, followed by Wiz Khalifa, who opened with “Black and Yellow” and encouraged the crowd to follow their dreams and smoke a lot of weed.

Wiz Khalifa, Snowglobe Music Festival, Tahoe, Snowglobe

Snowglobe Day 1 Headliner Wiz Khalifa gets the crowd riled.

Other surprise highlights of my day included the DJ duo of Steffi Graf. I ventured upon their tent late into their set, which was chock full of old house and disco. I was in heaven.

I’m ready and pumped for Day 2 which looks like it’s going to be cold, crisp and clear.  Here are all the photos from Day 1 at Snowglobe Music Fest, South Lake Tahoe, CA.

21 Days of Snowglobe: Day 3 Picks

Tahoe, Tahoe South, Snowglob

Snowglobe Music Festival is returning to Tahoe South for it’s second year and it’s not too late to join in on the fun. Three day passes and single day tickets are still on sale.

THE 21 DAYS of SNOWGLOBE: counting down to all things involving the fest, including insider tips, band interviews, event coverage and more! Day 18 of the 21 Days of Snowglobe brings you:

LAUREN’S PICKS – DAY 3

Welcome to Snowglobe! Festivals are my favorite way to discover new music, so be sure to catch a few of these lesser known acts before you ring in the New Year with the headliners Chromeo.

  • Poolside: Sierra Tent, 5:45-6:45. Disco influenced indie pop so melodic and chill that you can actually imagine playing it poolside. With an umbrella in your drink. For fans of: POP ETC, TOPS, Grizzly Bear, Goldroom.
  • Royal Teeth: Main Stage, 7:15-8:15. New Orleans based Royal Teeth has delicious and dreamy pop hooks with full choruses. The band claims their music is made for “adventures.” For fans of: Generationals, Atlas Genius, Real Estate.
  • Nobody Beats the Drum: Sierra Tent, 8:30-9:43. The Dutch Dance Music trio of NBTD has been creating quite the ruckus on their non-stop tour of North America this year. Their show, which features the sounds of electro, hiphop and breakbeat, is set to intense visuals on a 9 screen installation. Check out my interview with Jori Collignon for more on the group. For fans of: Hybrid, Machine Drum, Opencloud.

COMING UP:

  • Reviews and photos! See you there!

WHAT YOU MISSED:

21 Days of Snowglobe: Day 2 Picks

Tahoe, Tahoe South, Snowglob

Snowglobe Music Festival is returning to Tahoe South for it’s second year and it’s not too late to join in on the fun. Three day passes and single day tickets are still on sale.

THE 21 DAYS of SNOWGLOBE: counting down to all things involving the fest, including insider tips, band interviews, event coverage and more! Day 17 of the 21 Days of Snowglobe brings you:

LAUREN’S PICKS – DAY 2

Welcome to Snowglobe! Festivals are my favorite way to discover new music, so be sure to catch a few of these lesser known acts before the crowds convene for Deadmau5 and Flosstradamus.

  • ST. Lucia: Main Stage, 4:15-5:15. Johannesburg born Jean-Philip Grobler grew up traveling the world with a boys choir. Classically trained in the music of Bach and opera, Grobler turned to pop and his new EP, September is shimmery, golden and effervescent. For fans of: Capital Cities, Tanlines, Penguin Prison.
  • Plump DJs: Sierra Tent, 5:15-6:15. The London based duo of Lee Rous and Andy Gardner have been producing bass and techno fueled tracks in the house music scene since the late 90s. For those of us over the age of 30, Plump DJs will be a throwback to our younger years, but honestly, these boys haven’t lost their steam or their cool. For fans of Lee Coombs, Meat Katie, Koma and Bones.
  • Madeon: Main Stage, 7:00-8:00. This self-described “electro-pop-house-whatever” under-age (18!) producer from France samples, mixes and produces disco influenced, epically colorful, and embarrassingly invigorating sets. Like David Guetta but without the backlash. For fans of: Daft Punk, Girl Talk, and Kaskade as well as, if you actually love David Guetta but won’t admit it (or those of you that will).

COMING UP:

  • Who to see at the fest Day 3, reviews and photos! See you there!

WHAT YOU MISSED:

21 Days of Snowglobe: Day 1 Picks

Tahoe, Tahoe South, Snowglob

Snowglobe Music Festival is returning to Tahoe South for it’s second year and it’s not too late to join in on the fun. Three day passes and single day tickets are still on sale.

THE 21 DAYS of SNOWGLOBE: counting down to all things involving the fest, including insider tips, band interviews, event coverage and more! Day 16 of the 21 Days of Snowglobe brings you:

LAUREN’S PICKS – DAY 1

Welcome to Snowglobe! Festivals are my favorite way to discover new music, so be sure to catch a few of these lesser known acts before the crowd convenes for Wiz Khalifa.

  • Gentleman Hall: Main Stage, 3:30-4:30. Danceable, poppy, and they have a flute.  For fans of: David Bowie, Passion Pit, The Killers.
  • LYNX: Technibeats.com Stage, 3:15-4:15. This Bay Area producer is creating thought provoking music with her genre of EDM rooted in indie and folk. For fans of: Le Roux, NICO, Gotye, Allison Mosshart.
  • Baauer: Sierra Tent, 5:00-6:00. Start your afternoon out at the similar sounding SALVA show and then head over to the Sierra Tent to bang your head to this Brooklyn wonder kid’s mash-up of EDM and hip-hop. For fans of Flosstradamus, A$AP Rocky.
  • Beats Antique: Main Stage, 6:45-8:00. The energy, excitement and mesmerizing beauty of a Beats Antique show is a completely unique, provocative and dazzling experience. Check out our interview with Beats Antique from last week for more. For fans of: STS9, Les Claypool, Pentaphobe.
  • Archnemesis: Technibeats.com Stage, 7:00-8:00. These guys are fresh and awesome: producing trap that is new, layered and oozes soul.  Check out our interview with Curt Heiny of Archnemesis from last week for more. For fans of: Curtis Mayfield, Pretty Lights, EOTO.

COMING UP:

  • Who to see at the fest, reviews and photos! See you there!

WHAT YOU MISSED:

21 Days of Snowglobe: Drive Safe

Tahoe, Tahoe South, Snowglob

Snowglobe Music Festival is returning to Tahoe South for it’s second year and it’s not too late to join in on the fun. Three day passes and single day tickets are still on sale.

THE 21 DAYS of SNOWGLOBE: counting down to all things involving the fest, including insider tips, band interviews, event coverage and more! Day 12 of the 21 Days of Snowglobe brings you:

SNOW DRIVING SURVIVAL SKILLS

  • Be prepared.  If you are driving to Tahoe from the Bay and you do not have a four wheel drive vehicle you MUST have chains.  If you get caught driving without chains, you will get fined.  I would also recommend carrying the following in your car to Tahoe in the winter: a shovel, extra gloves and hats, flashlights and flares, an old sleeping bag or blanket.
  • Slow down and don’t tailgate.   Double the distance between you and the other cars.  In icy and snowy conditions,  if you’re doing 25 mph, you should have 8-10 car lengths between you and the car in front of you.   Don’t make any sudden erratic movements or changes to your pace or manner of driving. DON’T SLAM ON YOUR BRAKES. Remember when you are in a line of cars that while the choices of those in front of you affect you, your choices affect the cars behind you.   If something happens and you slam on your brakes, you are going to slide.  Your anti lock brakes will not help you in icy slippery conditions.
  • Look ahead.  Get ready for corners and other obstacles long before you arrive at them.  Have an exit plan.
  • Brake long before you enter a corner and accelerate out of the corner.
  • Control your speed and let your engine slow you down.  Shift into a lower gear any time you are going down a hill or steep grade or if you need to slow down.  Do this even if you drive an automatic.  By letting your engine control your speed, you won’t have to brake, which will keep your car from skidding and will keep the locals from screaming at frustration behind you over your brake lights.
  • Learn to control a skid.  If you start to skid, let off the brakes and avoid looking at the obstacle your skidding towards.   Looking at your exit, lightly turn into the skid and accelerate slightly.  In the event of an uncontrolled skid, if you don’t have room to steer out, head for a snowbank.
  • Get updates on road conditions and closures at Caltrans Website or by calling 1-800.427.7623

COMING UP:

  • 21 Days of Snowglobe: Who to See at the Fest, Day 1
  • 21 Days of Snowglobe: Interview with Quixotic Fusion

WHAT YOU MISSED:

21 Days of Snowglobe: 21 Questions with Robert Delong

Tahoe, Tahoe South, Snowglob

Snowglobe Music Festival is returning to Tahoe South for it’s second year and it’s not too late to join in on the fun. Three day passes and single day tickets are still on sale.

THE 21 DAYS of SNOWGLOBE: counting down to all things involving the fest, including insider tips, band interviews, event coverage and more! Day11 of the 21 Days of Snowglobe brings you:

21 QUESTIONS WITH ROBERT DELONG

Robert Delong is not just a DJ and five minutes in his show is enough to convince you otherwise.  The Seattle native, who now calls LA home, has created an immersive and emotional experience in his shows in which he uses MIDI interfaces, a full drum set, keyboards, laptops, game controllers and more to fuse electronic dance beats with impactful melodies.  His new album Just Movement will be released on Glassnote Records on January 22, 2013.  The first single from the album, titled “Global Concepts,” is available for preview via Soundcloud.  Big thanks to Delong who took the time over the holiday weekend to answer 21 Questions for the 21 Days of Snowglobe.

20Q RobertDelong copy

FOR MORE ON ROBERT DELONG:

ROBERT DELONG will be on the Main Stage on Sunday, December 30th at 3:00 PM. Check him out if the sounds of a SEGA take you back to Saturday mornings when you were a kid and your ipod includes tunes from Foster the People, Two Door Cinema Club, and YACHT alongside EDM.  Paint your face, join Delong’s “Tribe of Orphans” and get HappySkip it if: being surrounded by a crowd of people filled to the brim with optimism and happiness makes you cringe.

COMING UP:

  • 21 Days of Snowglobe: Interview with Quixotic Fusion
  • 21 Days of Snowglobe: Who to See Day 1

WHAT YOU MISSED:

21 Days of Snowglobe: Your Guide to Music Outside the Fest

Tahoe, Tahoe South, Snowglob

Snowglobe Music Festival is returning to Tahoe South for it’s second year and it’s not too late to join in on the fun. Three day passes and single day tickets are still on sale.

THE 21 DAYS of SNOWGLOBE: counting down to all things involving the fest, including insider tips, band interviews, event coverage and more! Day 10 of the 21 Days of Snowglobe brings you:

YOUR GUIDE TO MUSIC OUTSIDE THE FEST

Not buying a ticket to Snowglobe?  Coming early?  Staying late?  Here are all your options to party hardy outside the festival gates. 

  • Montblue is home to the Official Snowglobe After Parties. Entry is free to Snowglobe wristband holders but you can buy tickets separately if you are not attending the fest.

Post Globe, Snowglobe After Parties

  • Raw Bar recently opened in the location of the old Bill’s Casino. They’re hosting a hip hop extravaganza on Wednesday, Dec 26th and Snowglobe Afterparties every night after the fest.

  • The Divided Sky is hosting a New Year’s Eve Dance party with DJ Berkmon and the Meyers Roots boys playing Old Skool, Hip Hop, Reggae, and Funk as they ring in 2013.

COMING UP:

  • 21 Days of Snowglobe: Who to See at the Fest, Day 1
  • 21 Days of Snowglobe: Interview with Quixotic Fusion

WHAT YOU MISSED:

21 Days of Snowglobe: Interview with Beats Antique

Tahoe, Tahoe South, Snowglob

Snowglobe Music Festival is returning to Tahoe South for it’s second year and it’s not too late to join in on the fun. Three day passes and single day tickets are still on sale.

THE 21 DAYS of SNOWGLOBE: counting down to all things involving the fest, including insider tips, band interviews, event coverage and more! Day 9 of the 21 Days of Snowglobe brings you:

AN INTERVIEW WITH BEATS ANTIQUE

beats-knife-fight_web

Beats Antique is the confluence of three talented performers with very different backgrounds. Zoe Jakes: a classically trained dancer in jazz and ballet, who fell in love with belly dancing. David Satori: who graduated from the California Institute of the Arts with a degree in music performance and composition. Tommy Cappel: a Virginia native, the son of two music teachers, the brother of a drummer and a graduate of the Berklee College of Music in Boston. When Zoe approached the others about collaborating on an experimental project that involved belly dancing for Miles Copeland, they readily agreed and out of that Beats Antique was born. Six years later, Beats Antique is thriving on the support of their fans.  They recently released their seventh album, Contraption Vol II, and are coming off a tour schedule so insanely busy that it involved shows on twenty of the nights in the month of September alone.

Today, the group is in Egypt to headline The Great Convergence Festival: celebrating the dawn of a new era and possibly, the end of the world. Despite joking that they might not make it back, we’re all looking forward to seeing them play at Snowglobe Music Festival next week. Big thanks to David and Tommy who sat down for an interview with me before hopping a plane across the world.

David Satori, Sidecar Tommy, Beats Antique

Lauren: We are lucky to have you guys return frequently to Tahoe thanks to it’s proximity to the bay.  What’s your favorite thing about playing in Tahoe?

David: One of my favorite things is that people have a lot of energy up in that area, people that are there to be active, a lot of people who do a outdoor activities like skiing and mountain biking and all of the above, so it’s sort of a rowdy, fun healthy crowd and then there’s also the Grass Valley/Nevada City crowd that comes out, and the Truckee crowd and the Reno crowd.  It’s a real eclectic active community so we have a lot of fun and there is a lot of energy.  The combination of all that makes a good crowd.

Tommy: I like the fact that it’s so beautiful up there.

L: Next week, you fly out to Egypt to headline the Great Convergence Festival.

D: We might get abducted by aliens and then sucked into the wormhole.

L: You guys haven’t been to Egypt before, but, Tommy, you lived in Serbia?  

T: No, I didn’t live there, I played a festival there and visited there.  I had an amazing experience there and it was at a time when things were still a little chaotic for them as a country so it was a little nerve wracking going over there.  I assume it will be a bit of the same going to Egypt this time.

L: Your shows have a tendency to get a little wild.  What’s the most memorable thing that’s ever happened at a show that you didn’t expect?

T: We’ve had a lot of people jump on stage and do a lot of stage diving when the crowd was not prepared so the stage diver went into a empty abyss and hit the ground: serious stage diving.  The most important thing is that you have to acknowledge the crowd and the crowd acknowledged that you’re coming and a lot of people when they jump up on stage they’re like, “oh shit, I’m up on stage, I gotta do something fast!” and it just doesn’t work.  It’s better that it’s just the artist that does that, the crowd is there for them.  They want you to survive.

L: 2012 has been a busy year for you as a group – tons of touring, the release of an album, a big summer festival circuit – what were the challenges and highlights of such a jam packed tour year?

T: I think that the challenges and highlights are sort of the same thing.  Doing so many shows is really exciting but it also takes a lot out of us, just all the traveling involved doing all those shows is intense.  But you get out there on stage and you have a responsive crowd and everyone is excited and it makes it all worth it.  It’s kind of like the same thing: it’s challenging and fun and just necessary.  We’re responding to people wanting us to play and it’s kind of everything into one.

D: I think our most challenging weekend this summer was also our biggest and most exciting weekend at the same time.  We played Atlanta at a festival called Narnia and then flew to Red Rocks the next morning but our flight was cancelled so we had to rebook our flight and drive all night and then play Red Rocks sound check the next morning at 11 am but it’s red rocks so it’s super difficult but it’s so exciting.  The next night we had to leave from Red Rocks and fly to Seattle for Summer Meltdown.  It’s all a blur and it’s all amazing.

L: How awesome is Red Rocks?  That place is incredible.

T: Ridiculous.  You can’t replace that experience with anything else.  It’s such a beautiful place but then all the crowds are always really excited to be there so that makes it more amped up and then all the people that played there for so long.  As a whole, it’s amazing.

L: Do you have any routines that you keep in order to keep your sanity and keep a schedule when you’re touring?

T:  Honestly, our shows become a routine when we’re on tour. Getting on stage and doing sound check and doing the show.  Sound check is a good routine.  Occasionally we get some exercise, some yoga.

L: How does touring affect your studio work?  Does it make you more or less creative?

T: Touring gets in the way of studio work and studio work suffers a bit when you are on the road too much but at the same time, sometimes we come up with some really great songs on the road.  It’s just a matter of making time for both.

L:  Do you find that the audience is different between a music festival and one of your regular shows?

D: The festival crowd is there to party and the festival atmosphere is already exciting simply because it’s a festival.  The shows have their own excitement but there’s this overall festival excitement that can come over into your set which can be unexpected.  There are a lot of variables that you don’t know.  Sometimes you can be at a show and you know how the night is going to go based on the crowd but at a festival, sometimes the crowds get big in the middle of the set or halfway through the set it can get small because another act is going on at another tent and people want to see them.  When I go to festivals I only stay for three songs.  I never stay for the whole show.  Things are changing and people are coming in and out.

L: Do you guys find that new fans discover you at music fests?

D: Oh definitely.

T: That’s the place to pick up new fans.  We actually as well walk around and see what’s going on around us and find new bands that we like as well.  I think that also it gives artists a chance to see what you’re doing.  The whole thing is an immersive experience whereas at a show, everybody knows what they are going to see, they might be there with friends, it might be their first time but generally that show is about us.  It’s a different feel.

L: I really respect artists that have the courage and inspiration to bring something new to the stage in their live show and really build upon their album, which is something that you all excel at.  What dictates how your live show morphs into what it is over the album itself and how much of that is improvisation and how much of it is planned?

D: We definitely plan our sets out pretty carefully and we like to pick from a lot of our albums.   When we come out with a new album, we don’t necessarily just play all the stuff off the new album.  We really gravitate towards what we’ve been playing over the years and what works for the crowd.  We take some new songs.  A lot of the time when an album comes out, we’re working on music that hasn’t even been put on an album, and when it does come out we’ve been playing those songs already for a year.  It’s a weird cycle, for us, at least since we’re not a pop band playing hit songs that everyone needs to hear.  It’s a strange process.

L: How has your process of writing changed from your very first album to now?

D: I think it’s changed drastically.  The first album we did we were really just experimenting and didn’t know exactly what we were going to do.  It created a really experimental atmosphere whereas now it’s maybe not as experimental in that way but it’s experimental in the way of, “so what are we going to do next?”  The process of it too: the last five albums we’ve had to be writing a lot of stuff on the road and working on it in between shows and tours.  It is a bit chaotic.  With this next coming album we’re going to be working on this winter is going to be the first time since back in those days with the first two albums that we’ll be writing at home, in the same place, and being together, and working on it in an extended format.
L:  You recently said in an interview that Vol 2 is “an answer to volume 1…” that you are “tracing your roots back.”  It’s more acoustic whereas your last album had a little bit more electro based sound.  Are there feelings and emotions that influence and guide you at the start to where your albums head each time or is it something that happens more subconsciously and you realize it later on that it’s gone in this different direction?

D: I think for this album, we found what songs we had.  It was sort of collecting the songs we’d been working on as opposed to being really conscious and saying let’s make an album that sounds like this.  It was more of a compilation in a way.  We have a whole electronic side of what we do and we have the full acoustic side and we’re always trying to balance it out and I think this was a way of balancing it out a little more.

L: I saw you open for Les Claypool here in Tahoe a few years ago and at the time I had never heard of you.  It was an absolute delight and there were so many wonderful surprises for me throughout your set.  One of the things that definitely sticks out in my mind, and probably with a lot of your fans, were the animal masks.  Now that they’ve taken on such an individual nature and personality of their own, it’s almost like they are another member of the band.  Can we expect them to stick around?  

T: If David has anything to do with it, we’ll be wearing them the whole show.

D: Be careful what you ask for.

T: We sell them at our merch table so fans can go to our merch table or you can get them online at our website.  One of our goals with the animal masks is to have the audience participate a bit with us.  It’s really funny.  At every show, at least once person at almost every show has one: wearing an animal mask.  We really want to see the whole crowd wearing different animal masks.

D: We have one fan from Michigan who wears a baboon mask and he wears it the whole show.  It’s one of the impressive things I’ve ever seen in my whole life is this guy wearing this latex baboon mask for hours – two hours.  You gotta realize, that those things are not comfortable.

T: They’re hot.

D:  It’s really …. it kinda sucks when you wear it.

T:  It’s a labor of love.  We’re doing it for the people.

D:  It brings out a character in you that you might not have other.  When the guy with the baboon mask is there, he dances differently and he’s really fun to look at.  And then throughout the show you see the people around him start to interact with him and get more comfortable with the baboon.

L: So Beats Antique’s collective dream is an entire audience full of animal masks?

T and D:  YES.

L: You’ve worked with a lot of really talented collaborators: what dream collaborations do you have on your list for the future?

T:  We have a list of a lot of people.  It would be fun to do something with Bjork, with David Byrne, Peter Gabriel, Metalica.

D:  I would take Tool as well.

T: I’ve always wanted to collaborate with some more pop artists as well, just in general.

D:  Katy Perry.

T [laughing]: That’s David’s dream.  I’m more like lets work with Bon Iver, the Weekend or something.

L: Greatest accomplishment of 2012?  

T: Surviving.

D:  Yes, Suriving.

T:  Not breaking up.  The band not breaking up.  Funny but true.

L: Provided that you don’t get swept away into the wormhole on the solstice, what’s next on the horizon for 2013?  

D: The first part of the year we’re going to work on our album and then start touring like crazy again.

T:  International – Europe, South America, hopefully.

L:  Last but not least, what act are you each most looking forward to seeing at Snowglobe?

D: Deadmau5, he’s always fun to watch.  Wiz Khalifa.

L:  I’m really looking forward to seeing Chromeo.

D: Oh yeah!  Chromeo!  I forgot they were playing.  I axe all of the rest.  I just want to see them.

L:  Thanks guys!  I really appreciate you taking the time to talk to me and we’ll see you at Snowglobe.

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FOR MORE ON BEATS ANTIQUE:

BEATS ANTIQUE will be on the Main Stage on Saturday, December 29th at 6:45 PM.  Beats Antique is an eclectic mix of modern technology, live instrumentation, brass bands, string quartets, glitch, and dubstep accompanied by belly dancing and animal masks.  Frankly, it’s a not to be missed show.  Check them out: if you want to go down the rabbit hole.  Animal masks not required, but suggested.  Skip it if: you’re a huge fan already, have already seen the show this year and want to check out something new over at the Archnemesis show. Beats Antique’s new album, Contraption Vol. 2, is available via download on Amazon. Check out their new video for Skeleton Key, from Contraption Vol. 2, below.

COMING UP:

  • 21 Days of Snowglobe: Interview with Quixotic Fusion
  • 21 Days of Snowglobe: Who to See on Day 1!

WHAT YOU MISSED: